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Thread: vi/vim/gvim

  1. #1
    Mentor cga's Avatar
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    vi/vim/gvim

    OK, so do most of the vim folks prefer plain console mode vim or do you use the GUI version (gvim). Anyone use a vi other than vim (Elvis, nvi etc.)?


  2. #2

    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    I like vim the most. If I am in X then I use gvim, if I am sshing in or on the console then I use vim. As long as it is vim I am happy.

  3. #3

    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    gvim...gtk2 is sexy

  4. #4
    Mentor cga's Avatar
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    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    I don't really care for GUI editors. I tried really hard to like NEdit, but just could not get into the GUI. I think this one of the turn offs I have toward the newest EMACS 21, which is very GUI.

    [quote author=Tyr_7BE link=board=2;threadid=7485;start=0#msg68773 date=1059869397]
    gvim...gtk2 is sexy
    [/quote]

  5. #5

    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    I never understood the fascination with vi or emacs over such simple editors as pico or nano. What is the difference? What is it that makes it so "powerful"? I mean, what benefits does it has, over a simpler editor, that would make me want to spend time learning it?

  6. #6
    Mentor cga's Avatar
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    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    [quote author=trickster link=board=2;threadid=7485;start=0#msg68776 date=1059870057]
    I never understood the fascination with vi or emacs over such simple editors as pico or nano. What is the difference? What is it that makes it so "powerful"? I mean, what benefits does it has, over a simpler editor, that would make me want to spend time learning it?
    [/quote]

    That's a great question. I have been using JOE for quite a while because it is a very simple editor to use and becuase it is much like Wordstar and the old Borland turbo pascal editor I used way back in the dark ages. I find the keybindings to be very simple, yet very efficient.

    But, the folks who really love EMACS and/or vi are very vocal about them and it makes me want to try them out and see what all the fuss is about.

    The vi type editors are very efficient once you get the hang of the mode-thing and I kind of see the appeal in there. But with JOE, I have a keystroke to justify a paragraph and I can spell check a work or a whole edit buffer with a keystroke too, and i don't think vi does that. JOE is also able to know when to word wrap. When I am coding HTML, I want word wrap. When I an coding Python or dotfile, I don't want word wrap. In JOE, that's automatic.

    Both JOE and vi let you pass text in and out of a shell, and JOE lets you run a shell in a sub window, which is very cool; I like to run a split window in JOE with the Python inturpreter running in one half while I hack code. I can jump back and forth between a source file and the interactive inturpreter.

    Now I know that the vi folks will say that you can make vi do that by tweaking it a bit, but JOE does it "right out of the box".

  7. #7
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    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    vim, it's powerful and still easy to use.

    I do use gvim also but I tend to stay away from text files as much as possible so it's mostly when I'm in CLI anyways I use a text editor and then the choice is simple.

  8. #8

    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    vim, it's powerful
    Why?

    and easy to use
    I don't find it easier to use than any pico clones.

    With Joe or Pico or Nano, you have a little menu underneath that tells you what to do. As simple as that. It can't get much easier.

  9. #9

    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    [quote author=trickster link=board=2;threadid=7485;start=0#msg68809 date=1059918834]
    vim, it's powerful
    Why?

    and easy to use
    I don't find it easier to use than any pico clones.

    With Joe or Pico or Nano, you have a little menu underneath that tells you what to do. As simple as that. It can't get much easier.
    [/quote]

    The user manual that comes with it is freakin 50 pages, and you can do just about anything you could imagine if you know how. Once you get familiar with it it's really beautiful. Granted, if all you need to do is edit text files, then you should probably use something aimed at just that. Vim is kind of an editor, kind of a word processor, kind of an IDE. It supports a staggering number of languages with its syntax hilighting, and has a really nice plugin interface that makes it really extensible. I used it a lot when I was doing a lot of Java and C# for school. The two languages are pretty similar, so it's just a bit of textual manipulation to turn one into the other. Once I learned some of the quirks of both languages and started up vim, I could convert from Java to C# and back in less than 2 minutes, and that's with 3000 lines of code. It makes little tasks like that just a snap.

  10. #10

    Re:vi/vim/gvim

    When I use vim, I can use it for just about anything I want without having to do much more than a few keystrokes. I can turn syntax highlighting on and compile code straight from vim, or use regexp to search for all kinds of patterns, and use quick key strokes to multiply chars or remove/move text blocks anywhere.

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