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Thread: OpenSSH

  1. #1
    Advisor beezlebubsbum's Avatar
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    OpenSSH

    My website allows me to upload files to it using SSH, but the problem is I have never used it in my life, and I am still using the tried-and-tested ftp. Is there any advantages that SSH has over FTP? And if so, how exactly do I use it?
    My Website: http://ttgale.com
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    My Server Specs: AMD Athlon X2 3800+, 2gb DDR2 RAM, 1.5TB HDD, Ubuntu 9.10
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  2. #2
    Mentor jro's Avatar
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    Ehh, you can up load files with SSH but it is (IMHO) a rather round about way of getting a file onto a server. Theres nothing wrong with FTP, unless your paranoid about your transfer not being encrypted (oh dear god nooo!)

    As for using scp just use:

    Code:
    scp fileName(s) user@domain.com:/dir/to/copy/to
    In case you didn't know...
    jro - http://jeff.robbins.ws
    Linux counter#:213782
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  3. #3
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    <soapbox> Use scp. One of the beautiful things about running Linux on both workstation and server is having native SSH support. Everyone Should (capital S) rely on protocols that allow us to make file transfers and do remote connections over encrypted channels. When Debian had its big security break-in last year, it was because of sniffed passwords allowing local access on the servers, just as an example.</soapbox>

    The other thing is that scp is just as easy as FTP, so there's really no reason *not* to.

    Now, here's this little guy: :shock:

  4. #4
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    Here's the deal:

    If you use scp via ssh, your session is encrypted. if you need to move information from one server to another securely, that's how it is done.

    On the other hand, If you are publishing pages to your website, and the website is public, it shouldn't matter much, unless you have a 15k/day site, where it's so popular that people would be trying daily to hack it. It just depends on the security you need, or the security you want.

  5. #5
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    I prefer more secure connection whenever available. SSH is just as easy to use as ftp and you can use it with - let's say - gFTP just as you would use ftp. Or from cli you can use sftp which uses SSH also and is very handy from time to time.

    All in all I _LOVE_ ssh. It makes my day almiost every day :w00t:

  6. #6
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    In a sense, native SSH support is a great example / symptom of the different philosophies between Linux and Windows. Windows has and has always had (at least since Win95...correct me if I'm wrong here) a native FTP client. It has never had a native SSH client; to use SSH from Windows you need client software. SSH is a standard part of every Linux distro I've ever seen. It's one of those things that constantly annoyed me at my last job where I *had* to run Windows on my desktop; every time I'd fire up a command line and try to SSH and get dissed by the system.

  7. #7

    Re: OpenSSH

    Go here to download PuTTY, a very good ssh client for various platforms including Windoze:

    http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/

    Oh yeah, it's free, too.

    jb

  8. #8
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    just because it hasn't mentioned, i'm going to mention it, you don't need scp to move files over ssh, there are other alternatives, one being just 'sftp' (comes with ssh, so i bet you have it), that will give you an ftp-like interface

    the other is by piping into an ssh command, this is my absolute favorite

    Code:
    tar cvzf - <director> | ssh <server> -l <username> "tar xvzf -"

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