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Thread: News: Linux Certs Gaining Popularity Among IT Pros

  1. #1
    Mentor jro's Avatar
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    News: Linux Certs Gaining Popularity Among IT Pros

    Ahh the great debate. To certify or not to certify.

    Certification proves basic knowledge, not competency. But they do look nice on a resume _IF_ accompanied with relavent experience.

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    Certs, more than just fresh breath!

    If you want to work in the computer/IT world you have to have some papers!

    I may not seem very serious most of the time, cause I ain't, but here is one subject I have lots of experience with! I have never gotten a piece of paper for learning anything, I goofed my way out of college without a degree, started and stopped at several tech schools and some home study thingies. And by not having that piece of paper my life has been more difficult than anyone would want!

    Jump through some hoops, it only hurts for awhile. Get those CERTS and you will have fresher breath and a JOB. This is no BS from Fatal, this is something you can take to the bank!

    Do it!

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    Re: Certs, more than just fresh breath!

    Quote Originally Posted by Fatal Error
    If you want to work in the computer/IT world you have to have some papers!

    I may not seem very serious most of the time, cause I ain't, but here is one subject I have lots of experience with! I have never gotten a piece of paper for learning anything, I goofed my way out of college without a degree, started and stopped at several tech schools and some home study thingies. And by not having that piece of paper my life has been more difficult than anyone would want!

    Jump through some hoops, it only hurts for awhile. Get those CERTS and you will have fresher breath and a JOB. This is no BS from Fatal, this is something you can take to the bank!

    Do it!
    I'm not as old as Fatal, but I too have taken the rougher road as far as edu is concerned. I'm fortunate to have been in my profession for over 25 years, but some of those years are better left forgotten for all the frustration I've had to go though. I agree whole heartedly with my good friend's quote above... Getting some good experience is great, but having the edu credentials with it is even better.

    If you don't believe us, just go take a look at the hoards of foreign folks coming over here, willing to work for half the wages :roll: . You don't have to look far... They're right outside your window.
    Steve

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    Mentor jro's Avatar
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    Alot of the people I have worked with in the programming industry are either over educated or under educated. Oddly the best flat out programmer I ever knew had no college, he barely finished high school, but he couldn't architect very well. Alot of his projects were poorly laid out but were nice because of brilliant bursts programming.

    On the other hand the best architect I ever knew had a masters degree and just about every cert there is. He could plan and implement the largest software projects and his programming was meticulous and precise.

    So I don't think the depth of understanding can be gauged by certs and degrees, rather, I think it reflects the demeanor of the individual. I could be completely off my rocker too..
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    Quote Originally Posted by jro
    Alot of the people I have worked with in the programming industry are either over educated or under educated. Oddly the best flat out programmer I ever knew had no college, he barely finished high school, but he couldn't architect very well. Alot of his projects were poorly laid out but were nice because of brilliant bursts programming.

    On the other hand the best architect I ever knew had a masters degree and just about every cert there is. He could plan and implement the largest software projects and his programming was meticulous and precise.

    So I don't think the depth of understanding can be gauged by certs and degrees, rather, I think it reflects the demeanor of the individual. I could be completely off my rocker too..
    Point well taken jro. The balance of life experience and formal education is always interesting to observe. What I've seen most often, however, is the most "secure" jobs available are held by those with a degree, but that's in the manufacturing secter. In the computer programming field, we're talking about a career that can run the gamut... From a gang of boot-strapped garage start-up rowdies to a group of venture capitol preppys.
    Steve

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    Certs

    w00t, Mark says I am certifiable! And thats from an IT pro! w00t

    certifiable | certifiable |
    adj.

    1. presenting symptoms of mental illness sufficient for legal
    commitment to a mental institution.

    Syn: certified.
    WordNet 1.5

    2. capable of being guaranteed or certified: a certifiable
    fact.
    WordNet 1.5

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    I don't know if certs are the way to go.

    A College Degree is, but certs?

    I'd hire (and I know alot of HR managers who would) someone with hands on experience before I hired someone with just the certs. They certainly help, but they don't mean anything. Especially MCSE or any of the MCS certs.

    I have a 2 year degree. I'm 2/3s of the way done with a 4 year degree in History, and I work for a webhosting company as a sys admin. I know my stuff when it comes to linux, unix, networking and windows to a degree. I can program in html, php, c and bash. I haven't had any actual training in it, and my father, who worked for IBM for 28 years and spent several more in teh IT field has claimed that I probably know more than he does.

    Certs are nice, but they're just paper.

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    Mentor jro's Avatar
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    I have to disagree with you mcangeli. They aren't just paper, if they were they would just hand them out. Now, before you say it, yes, some of the tests are just about easy enough to where they SHOULD just hand out the cert, but not all of them are like this.

    I agree that hands on experience is far more valuable than a cert, but what if you are just coming into a field or just out of college? In the absence of any experience (for an entry level job for instance) a cert can add credibility. But remember what I said in my first post, they are a nice addition, but can't stand on their own.
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    Well, jumping into the mix two weeks late is probably bad but here goes...

    I think it depends on the position and definatly timing. Way back in the day, when a Novell CNE was glorious, it definatly made a difference. But after everyone started the pursuit, the importance definatly decreased. I remeber the same for Microsft MCSE's when it first came of. When I got my Citrix CCA, that was a big deal for a while, then once again, they meant "much less".

    After the Sullivan Colleges, etc, get ahold of them, and "anyone can get cerified for $1900" that happens. I've seen alot of MCSE's melt at the sight of a command prompt. Of course, lets not foget about a display of common sense and think ability....

    From a systems engineer type position, I don't know if a degree in IT Business Managment would be very attractive, and vise versa for the IT Manger having a cert or two....

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    Jumping into the mix even later is worse but here goes...

    Any kind of certs are a plus to whatever you are doing. It's also true that the certs don't mean sh!t when determining how competence someone is. But there never is only one deciding factor in anything, be it IT or life in general.

    For me, I'm lazy bustard who HATES taking tests. I'm one of those free spirit who don't like to define to anything. But then again, I dont' need them. I run my own small business.

    But if I had to choose between getting all kinds of certs and a college degree, for life or death, then I would choose a college degree any day. It's just the basic educational foundation that you can built on.

    If you have a college degree and get a certs, then it will help you advance further in your carrier.

    It's true that some with papers can be so stupid you can't help but wonder how the heck they ever made it through.
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