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For those who have FreeBSD
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Thread: For those who have FreeBSD

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  1. #1
    Guest

    For those who have FreeBSD

    There's a very nice file in FreeBSD called /etc/login.access. This is used to say who can log on on the machine and from where. I'll link you to a very well made tutorial by Michael Lucas. I'm seriously thinking that all UNIX OSes should have a file like that. I emailed the NetBSD people to ask them if they intended to include something like that.

    http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/bsd/2001...y_Daemons.html

  2. #2

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD

    hmm .. I have login.access in my /etc .. and im using slack .. I think its some file that was taken from unix .. like the /etc/porttime who defines at what times the users are allowed to log on.

  3. #3

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD

    Doesn't Slack use BSD init too? If it wasn't for the Linux kernel, I'd say it was BSD.

  4. #4
    Guest

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD


    hmm .. I have login.access in my /etc .. and im using slack .. I think its some file that was taken from unix .. like the /etc/porttime who defines at what times the users are allowed to log on.
    Well I don't know about the different Linux distributions.

  5. #5
    Guest

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD


    Doesn't Slack use BSD init too? If it wasn't for the Linux kernel, I'd say it was BSD.
    slack uses BSD style bootscripts
    it's a lot better/nicer than regular Sysv init bootscripts
    i also used BSD style bootscripts on my lfs system

  6. #6

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD

    I thought so. I prefer SysV init myself because it's simpler (don't have a lot of rc.* files to deal with plus all the startup scripts are in one directory) but everyone has their preference.

  7. #7

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD


    I thought so. I prefer SysV init myself because it's simpler (don't have a lot of rc.* files to deal with plus all the startup scripts are in one directory) but everyone has their preference.
    I thought thats what the BSD init is all about .. very confusing ???

  8. #8

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD

    I used to like the BSD style, it was very straightforward and simple. But SysV is growing on me, I like being able to use the same script to start and stop a service/whatever

  9. #9
    Guest

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD


    I thought so. I prefer SysV init myself because it's simpler (don't have a lot of rc.* files to deal with plus all the startup scripts are in one directory) but everyone has their preference.
    actually, BSD init style is more simple because it just has one script for each runlevel. so if u want a service to start up at a certain runlevel u just add the command to start the service to the right script and that's it. in Sysv init u have to create a nice script for the service, and then put all the symlinks to it in the right places...

    and with BSD init the scripts are in one directory (this might depend on the implementation of course but if it's done right they're all in one directory). In fact, Sysv init is the one that uses multiple directories for it. if i'm not mistaken (it's been a couple of months since i used Sysv init) it has a directory for all the scripts (/etc/rc.d/init.d), then a directory for the main scripts (usually /etc/rc.d) and then a directory for each runlevel (/etc/rc.d/rcX.d with X being the number of the runlevel)

    Sysv Init is nice though, i like the way it's set up but i really prefer BSD init because it's just soooo much simpler

  10. #10

    Re: For those who have FreeBSD


    actually, BSD init style is more simple because it just has one script for each runlevel. so if u want a service to start up at a certain runlevel u just add the command to start the service to the right script and that's it. in Sysv init u have to create a nice script for the service, and then put all the symlinks to it in the right places...
    "The system initialization scripts can execute scripts from multiple rc.d directories. The default locations are /usr/local/etc/rc.d and /usr/X11R6/etc/rc.d, but these may be overridden with the local-startup rc.conf variable."

    That is a quote from the rc manpage in FreeBSD. It shows that by default, scripts go in two different directories, and even more can be added.

    and with BSD init the scripts are in one directory (this might depend on the implementation of course but if it's done right they're all in one directory). In fact, Sysv init is the one that uses multiple directories for it. if i'm not mistaken (it's been a couple of months since i used Sysv init) it has a directory for all the scripts (/etc/rc.d/init.d), then a directory for the main scripts (usually /etc/rc.d) and then a directory for each runlevel (/etc/rc.d/rcX.d with X being the number of the runlevel)
    Yeah, SysV init does require that you link script to different directories for different runlevels, but it's easy to memorize where they are. The reason that BSD doesn't do it this way is because it doesn't have runlevels to begin with. You're either in multi-user or single-user mode.

    But the main point I wanted to make was about all the rc.* files. rc.conf is just confusing for me. You set variables for the system to use, but what exactly uses them and how do you know all the possible variables? SysV just seems simpler to me because every script is in it's runlevel directory and is easy to manipulate.

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