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Thread: Graphical Tool Kits

  1. #1

    Graphical Tool Kits

    Which would you guys recomend using/coding in: GTK, QT2, tk, swing for open source software.

  2. #2
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    Re: Graphical Tool Kits

    KDevelop 2.0

  3. #3
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    Re: Graphical Tool Kits

    I definitely recommend QT. *I just compiled a QT2 program written on and for MS Windows on Linux using QT 3. *It compiled without hitch and ran just fine (it was a relatively simple program, but still ). *

    I've used GTK and Swing (and to a very limited extent wxWindows) and neither is nearly as nice as QT. *QT is very well done and very well documented and supported. *Plus Trolltech (the company behind QT) is a big proponent of Linux, open source and KDE.

  4. #4

    Re: Graphical Tool Kits


    I definitely recommend QT. I just compiled a QT2 program written on and for MS Windows on Linux using QT 3. It compiled without hitch and ran just fine (it was a relatively simple program, but still ).

    I've used GTK and Swing (and to a very limited extent wxWindows) and neither is nearly as nice as QT. QT is very well done and very well documented and supported. Plus Trolltech (the company behind QT) is a big proponent of Linux, open source and KDE.
    Does QT have a simpler coding API?

  5. #5
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    Re: Graphical Tool Kits

    Does QT have a simpler coding API?
    QT has a different way of programming than traditional toolkits like motif or gtk. Once you get use to it, it becomes very easy.

    As for the API, I don't know if it is really simpler. But it is very standardized and very well documented with many examples and code snippits.

    One example of how QT differs from other toolkits is how it handels events. In other toolkits like motif, you would use virtual functions to handle events. While this is effective, it is a hassle to program even the simplest of buttons. In QT, they use a signal and slot system where you can connect and event (like a button click or a mouse move or a window resize) to a method (either a built in method or one that you write yourself). QT also provides virtual functions in case you need to use them. (GTK uses a similar method of event handling).

    Another thing is QT is written for c++ and has wrappers in other languages like python, perl, and even c#. GTK is written for c. I guess it depends on what language you are comfortable in.

  6. #6

    Re: Graphical Tool Kits

    Well, actually, GTK has many more language bindings than does Qt, but I still prefer Qt. Qt does a nice job of sticking to what C++ programmers are traditionally use to. In some other GUI APIs, you need to use some sort of specialized, API-specific string handling class, object or struct or something along those lines. Qt takes advantage of C++'s polymorphic abilities, so while Qt uses its own QString class internally, you don't have to if you don't want to. In fact, I prefer using the traditional STL ropes/C++ string class instead. I find that to be much more versatile. Also, the API is very intuitive. E.g. when you want text from a text box named TextBox, just called TextBox->text() and it will return the text in the text box.

  7. #7
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    Re: Graphical Tool Kits

    GTK and QT may be cute to look at, but TK is the most portable one. One Unix it uses TCL/TK which is almost always installed. On Windows, it uses Windows' GUI (can't remember the name)

  8. #8

    Re: Graphical Tool Kits


    GTK and QT may be cute to look at, but TK is the most portable one. One Unix it uses TCL/TK which is almost always installed. On Windows, it uses Windows' GUI (can't remember the name)
    Very good point. I know GTK has been ported to Windows (though I think it is only 1.2) has QT3 been ported? How hard is it to install the libs under other OS's?

  9. #9
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    Re: Graphical Tool Kits

    Getting GTK to work under Windows isn't that hard, but I'm pretty sure that people will be annoyed if you make them download an additionnal library (poor guys, they don't have apt-get )

    I don't know if QT is available for Windows.

  10. #10

    Re: Graphical Tool Kits


    has QT3 been ported? How hard is it to install the libs under other OS's?
    Yes, there is a Windows version of Qt. However, it is not free software. This is definitely something to consider if you wish to write programs that can be run on Windows and Unix.

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