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Thread: Setting time on the machine

  1. #1

    Setting time on the machine

    RH7.2
    When I boot the right time, but after a couple of hours or sometimes days it reverts back 5 hours. Any ideas why this could be happening?

  2. #2

    Re: Setting time on the machine

    Beats me. Read the man page for 'date' and 'tzselect', those should help. Then make sure your computer is in the right timezone, and has the right date set.

  3. #3

    Re: Setting time on the machine

    You can run a cron job and have your time be set to the atomic clock every hour or so...

  4. #4

    Re: Setting time on the machine

    But that's not a fix for his problem, that's a kluge and shouldn't be necessary

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    Re: Setting time on the machine


    RH7.2
    When I boot the right time, but after a couple of hours or sometimes days it reverts back 5 hours. Any ideas why this could be happening?
    It might be a hardware problem. How old is your computer? Have you thought about buying another battery for your real time clock? That might help. It might not, but it wouldn't be too expensive to find out.

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    Re: Setting time on the machine




    It might be a hardware problem. *How old is your computer? *Have you thought about buying another battery for your real time clock? *That might help. *It might not, but it wouldn't be too expensive to find out.
    If I understand correctly he is losing the time while the system is running. Which wouldnt have anything to do with the battery ( I have ran systems before w/accurate time w/o a battery).
    Does the hardware time and the system time differ?

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    Re: Setting time on the machine




    If I understand correctly he is losing the time while the system is running. *Which wouldnt have anything to do with the battery ( I have ran systems before w/accurate time w/o a battery).
    Does the hardware time and the system time differ?
    I was thinking that maybe his system was checking the hardware time at periodic intervals and was thus getting incorrect times. Does Linux only check the time against the hardware clock on boot up or does it do it periodically?

  8. #8
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    Re: Setting time on the machine




    I was thinking that maybe his system was checking the hardware time at periodic intervals and was thus getting incorrect times. *Does Linux only check the time against the hardware clock on boot up or does it do it periodically?
    Great minds must think alike! I was wondering the same thing, thats why I was curious if the hardware clock and the system clock differed.

  9. #9
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    Re: Setting time on the machine

    I read on lkml that a problem exist with IDE transfers and the Linux clock... And now my computer is starting to show the effect of this - heavy IO activity makes the clock loose time.

  10. #10
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    Re: Setting time on the machine

    I didnt see anybody mention this, but the clock is sometimes generated by a timing crystal (more accurate than any ttl / cmos method I have ever seen/designed) and if the crystal blows, a second is no longer actully a real second. If you are good with electonics, you could try to locate the timing circuit and see if a crystal is used (sometimes in a TO type package, any flavor). As for the question of system and hardwware clocks -- they can differ. You can have the mainboard's clock set different to the OS. the GMT option is for that. It can offset the mb clock or sync exactly to it.

    One method to try to trouble shoot this idea, is to swap the drive into a functional PC and see if the time drifts as well on the alternate box. Or on the flipside, drop a different drive into that box and see what happens. My feeling is from my experiences with linux, IO has had a negligible effect on any system. I had a linux box doing some pretty nasty IDE I/O and it didnt lose crap for time. Basically, a proggie that wrote random bits to the disk (across the entire disk as a way of clearing it to restore the boot sector). I ran it over and over again for a week (the next time I saw my buddy I was doing it for).

    Dont hose your rig until you are ABSOLUTELY sure of the problem's cause.

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