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Thread: need help in building my own computer for Fedora Linux?

  1. #1
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    need help in building my own computer for Fedora Linux?

    I am building my own computer for specifically Fedora Core Linux. I need to know what motherboard, processor, video card, and NIC card, etc., that is compatible with Fedora Core Linux. Your help is appreciated.

    thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Have you checked with Fedora's hardware compatibility list?

    Also check this one out.

    http://www.linuxcompatible.org/compatibility.html
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  3. #3
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    I don't think that you need to worry about the majority of the hardware out there. The main reason for that is that there is a driver somewhere that will probably work, especially if you stick to components that are fairly popular. Of course, if you have difficulty compiling things or are a newbie you might not want to purchase your dream hardware that is difficult to get running under Linux.

    The real question is this: are you wanting only open-source/open standards/well documented drivers and the compatible hardware? Do you feel that if a product has only closed source drivers for it from the manufacturer then it is not worth purchasing?

    If I was going to go for a true FLOSS compatible system I'd go with an Intel reference board running the appropriate CPU, chock it full of RAM, run onboard Intel graphics, sound, networking, etc. I'd make sure that every piece of hardware had an open source driver for it. If not, I'd avoid it or I'd have to weigh the decision using a matrix that gave more points for open-source then lesser points for closed source but rather open references/documentation (so that people can write their own device compliant drivers) then few, if any, points for a completely closed source/documentation driver set.

    Reality being what it is, you need to weigh your options against what you are intending to use the computer for, what your tolerance for closed-source is, etc. Then weigh that against the price you are willing to pay. A completely open system that cost more than 25% more than a partially closed system doesn't make too much sense to me. To you, it might. Only you know that answer.

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  4. #4
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    Get any processor you want. Look into what you want and google it for compatibility. Just avoid ATI if you want a gaming rig. nVIDIA and Intel are the only two that seem to get making drivers that work right on linux. Intel even has gone as far as open sourcing most of their code for their drivers. ATI and nVIDIA are still closedsource, but ATI's perform at best 60% of what the Windows counterpart would. Sucks, but the truth.

  5. #5

    I'm not sure I agree here

    Quote Originally Posted by stryder144 View Post
    I don't think that you need to worry about the majority of the hardware out there. The main reason for that is that there is a driver somewhere that will probably work, especially if you stick to components that are fairly popular. Of course, if you have difficulty compiling things or are a newbie you might not want to purchase your dream hardware that is difficult to get running under Linux.
    I'm not so sure I agree with this outlook. For desktops it's a little more relaxed than for laptops, but the right choice of hardware can make the difference between a demon and a dawg. Oh, and if you're looking for a laptop/notebook/portable check out www.linux-laptops.net. (Yeah, it's a shameless plug for a site I've found useful on more than one occasion.)

    CPU brand is not so important as proper integration/implementation of the motherboard. I've had good results with Dell hardware (although I know you are wanting to build from scratch, I mention it as a sort of reference point), and with boards from Albatron, Asus, and Texas Micro (industrial computers). The biggie is the support chipset. Whether your CPU is AMD or Intel (and why run anything else these days?) 32 or 64-bit architecture, Fedora is capable of supporting it and will run well given a good chipset and adequate RAM that is properly matched to the system.

    A small investment in the right RAM can make a big difference, too. If you can afford to, stay away from SDRAM and go with DDR SDRAM or even RDRAM if your board supports it. This small step up in quality makes a noticeable difference in performance. Go with a minimum of 512 megs for a full-blown system, and the more the merrier.

    Quote Originally Posted by stryder144 View Post
    IThe real question is this: are you wanting only open-source/open standards/well documented drivers and the compatible hardware? Do you feel that if a product has only closed source drivers for it from the manufacturer then it is not worth purchasing?

    If I was going to go for a true FLOSS compatible system I'd go with an Intel reference board running the appropriate CPU, chock it full of RAM, run onboard Intel graphics, sound, networking, etc. I'd make sure that every piece of hardware had an open source driver for it. If not, I'd avoid it or I'd have to weigh the decision using a matrix that gave more points for open-source then lesser points for closed source but rather open references/documentation (so that people can write their own device compliant drivers) then few, if any, points for a completely closed source/documentation driver set.

    Reality being what it is, you need to weigh your options against what you are intending to use the computer for, what your tolerance for closed-source is, etc. Then weigh that against the price you are willing to pay. A completely open system that cost more than 25% more than a partially closed system doesn't make too much sense to me. To you, it might. Only you know that answer.

    Cheers
    On balance, this is a sensible approach. I'd disagree on what the real question is, but I'm more pragmatic when it comes to computers: they gotta get the job done. Closed Source, Open Source, or whatever source, your machine has to be well matched to the distribution you have chosen to do your tasks, and to the tasks as well. Intel boards are well implemented for the most part, and aren't always the most expensive in their price points. Don't overlook other boards if cost is a factor, though.

    As for drivers: I'd echo the sentiments about video cards given here and elsewhere - Nvidia and Intel are great choices, and their drivers are fairly simple to install correctly. Sound cards: for "normal" uses you can't beat the support for the Sound Blaster 16 or Live. If you are looking for a more "high-end" card, check out M-Audio. (Pricey, but worth it if you need the horsepower.)

    Some areas of potential problems for you are: network adapters and modems (especially modems), USB interfaces, and oddball sound and video cards. If you have to have a particular strange card, do the research before you buy and see if you can put up with the headaches of getting it to work with Fedora (or whichever distro you choose to use...) Scanners, digital cameras, all-in-one printers, and other accessories can also be real sources of aggravation unless chosen carefully.

    I tend to shy away from heavily integrated motherboards (especially integrated video and sound) unless these integrated features may be disabled easily from CMOS or FLASH setup facilities to allow for the addition of daughter cards which do a better job. Video adapters which "share" (read: steal) main RAM for video rendering are especially poor compromises.

    I can see this is getting a bit long. One last word and I'll get outta here. Don't skimp on the case and power supply! Unless you are severely space-restricted, get the extra deep mid-tower or even a full-tower case with plenty of room. Some even have the fancy mounts for tilting the power supply up and out of the way to make it easier to do upgrades without dismantling everything. The supply should be a good brand (say, PC Power & Cooling or Antec) which has a quiet and reliable fan and ample power for all your drives and stuff. You'll be happier with a quiet, reliable, and good-looking system than you will with a cheap unit that shortens your system life and makes routine maintenance a headache.

    Good luck building your system. Write it up here when you get through?

    Later On,
    Dave
    Addiction to the truth can be painful.

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