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Thread: Welcome new members!

  1. #81
    Greetings. I'm new to the Linux world. I've been asked to get RedHat Linux 4 installed as a VM using VMWare Server (the free version). I'm running into a problem during the installation when RedHat does not find any devices. When I select to manually add the devices, I can see the Adaptec AACRAID driver on the list, but when I select to add the device, it says it is loading it, but the device never loads.
    The server I am installing on is a Dell PowerEdge 1650 and I have installed Linux on the box from the same CDs successfully, but it will not find the RAID controller and drives when I try to install it as a virtual machine on VMWare Server.
    Does anyone have a clue what I need to do to check the RedHat installer to recognize the virtual drivers for the Adaptec raid controller?

  2. #82
    Administrator Advisor peter's Avatar
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    I've had problems like that in the past.

    Try configuring the RAID controller and its drives as soon as the RAID BIOS loads up. This occurs before the grub prompt. The driver may be expecting the drives to be hardware RAIDed already.

    Then try installing with the "noprobe" option to select the driver. (Which looks like what you did). Linux may find the card just fine after configuring the RAID too, so try the auto mode first.

  3. #83
    Thanks. I'll give that a try. I'm new to Linux, so I appreciate the help.

  4. #84

    Smile

    Hi i am teja from india studyin in IIT kgp
    so I am newbie to the great world Linux
    I hope I ll explore this world starting here

  5. #85
    Administrator Advisor peter's Avatar
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    Hello Teja, welcome to the community!

  6. #86
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    Mr

    Hi,

    I am a new member to openfree, but i have been a member with debian mailing lists and am a enthusiast in Linux. I am basically an engineer and at my age( I am 50) i am expected to incline towards management side, rather than technical. But somehow i am keeping my interest in esoteric(?) items like Linux alive. I have been trying all Linuxes.. mostly Debian since my introduction to Linux in 1999. Sadly I have not been able to project Linux as a viable alternative to MS largely because (i) MS is already pirated and freely available (ii) Linux does not seem to offer any niche market in any area except that of a networked OS.

  7. #87
    Administrator Advisor peter's Avatar
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    Aram,

    I think you underestimate the value of Linux on servers. It may not be popular on the desktop, but it is increasingly used in the back office to power business and web applications.

    IBM, for example, has developed Linux variants to work on almost their entire line of servers, and it, like may other manufacturers, contribute to the Open Source community. Some would argue that corporate sponsorship is bad, but I feel its a compromise solution that helps both sides.

    It is for the Open Source community to be alert to the dangers and take appropriate actions when it's interests are threatened.

    At work, no server used in my small group uses windows. Daily documentation relies on mediawiki on LAMP; IP address assignments use IPplan; traffic graphing monitoring uses MRTG; network configuration backups are done using RANCID; network configuration updates are done using expect; Samba for Windows user's home directories; Open LDAP and RADIUS for server, web application and network device authentication; and most monitoring uses some sort of inhouse open source tools based on perl.

    People often say that Open Source development relies on projects of varying levels of commitment. This is true of any class of software. Small companies come and go just like developers. It is up to the consumer to choose the most viable alternatives whenever possible when they have a choice.

    It is only a matter of time before Linux becomes popular on the desktop. The latest versions of Fedora and Ubuntu are very close competitors in terms of features to the Windows / Office suite. Once OpenOffice has better support for Exchange meeting calendars, I'd use it for most of my daily activities. I gave it a try for a few months, but it was a hassle.

    Linux, like Apple, needs exposure in schools. If all students are exposed to it, the OS will become more popular. By the end of this year, the OLPC project, running on Linux, will deploy educational, Linux based Laptop computers around the world. It is an encouraging development. Many governments are migrating to Linux, forcing it's exposure their populations.

    It is true that windows is widely pirated, and in many countries it is available for virtually free. The advantages Linux will provide to governments and citizens alike are less hassle from software license keys, less resource utilization allowing it to run on much older and/or cheaper hardware, less susceptibility to malware and greater stability.

    To expect Linux to dominate the desktop in a MS sense may be wishful thinking, but there is no doubt in my mind that the two standards will at least coexist in a fierce rivalry of mutual respect and slowly equalizing power much in the way we see it with AMD and Intel, and Nintendo, Sony and MS in the area of game consoles.

    We should also not make the mistake of making a buying decision on using Open Source versus MS. The needs you have should be the over riding concern. We chose in my work group Linux primarily because we didn't have to go to the accounts department all the time to buy new software, and the software did what we wanted. If our need was a high level of off-the-shelf integration with a Windows product used in another part of the business, then Linux may not have been the choice.

    Finally, with the development of web applications in many walks of life, Linux on the desktop may be less relevant, as the features of your web browser become increasingly important. The desktop could easily be just a lightweight operating system to support Internet Explorer, Opera or Firefox. This is especially true in businesses and other organizations where there is often no real need to store documents on personal computers with centralized document libraries being easier to maintain.

    The next few years will be very interesting.

  8. #88
    Newbie
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    I'm not really new. Just been away for a while.

    Nice new place you guys have here.

  9. #89
    Administrator Advisor peter's Avatar
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    Welcome back!

  10. #90
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    Thanks.

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