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Thread: Unix Network Programming Review

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  1. #1
    Aaron_Adams
    Guest

    Unix Network Programming Review

    So far this book has been a wonder of knowledge. I recommend it to anyone that is looking for a thorough understanding of network programming. I'm not too far yet, but I felt like expressing my thoughts on it so far.

    The only problem I have with it, is the one that everyone seems to mention, and that is the author's use of wrapper functions. This has actually caused me to take more time to learn the ccode, even though it saves code space in the book.

    I also feel wierd about starting off just using an already made header for all the programs, as I'd like to get used to knowing which headers to include for each program ahead of time, rather then have 1 header that includes all headers that may be needed. My reasoning for that is... when I make my own network application, I don't plan on including a premade header that includes a bunch of code, #ifdefs, and #defines I won't need. What I've been doing is rewriting the programs that are included, without the header file and wrapper functions just to get used to the process. The further I get into the book, I'm sure I'll become more comfortable with the wrapper functions and just including the premade header.

    Although I'm not too far into the book yet, I can already say I've learned quite a bit, and it's definately worth looking into. I'm also reading TCP/IP Illustrated Vol1, and I must say getting into the nitty gritty of the protocols while I'm doing network programming at the same time is helping. I'd recommend reading it as well, especially if you want a very in depth idea of what exactly you're programming. I've also hard that Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment ( i think that's the title ) is a good companion as well, for any interested. All of these books are written by W. Richard Stevens ( RIP ).


    P.S. I'm buying "The C Programming Language" as soon as I get payed, hopefully it will be a good companion!


  2. #2
    JimH
    Guest

    Re: Unix Network Programming Review

    When you get finished reading it completely, write up your thoughts and we will put it up on the site. ;D

    Jim H

  3. #3
    Aaron_Adams
    Guest

    Re: Unix Network Programming Review

    I'll do that for sure. May as well write something up on TCP/IP Illustrated and The C book when I finish them as well.

  4. #4
    JimH
    Guest

    Re: Unix Network Programming Review

    ;D

    Jim H

  5. #5
    nfallon
    Guest

    Re: Unix Network Programming Review

    So your learning all about the seven layers of the iso model and which sections belong to tcp and ip. I had a headache for weeks after I took that in school. Cisco is always looking for people that really get into that. ;D

    Neil

  6. #6
    Aaron_Adams
    Guest

    Unix Network Programming Review

    It actually hasn't mentioned the ISO model in the book, which surprises me. It only refers to the 4 layers ( application, transport, network, link ) of the TCP/IP suite. I made a point of memorizing the ISO model along time ago to prevent big headaches lol.

    Perhaps one day a job with CISCO will be within my grasp!

  7. #7
    nfallon
    Guest

    Re: Unix Network Programming Review

    I interviewed with Cisco when I first got out of school. I begged them to stop the interview half way through it telling them that I didn't think that I was right for them. The woman continued for an hour insisting that I go to work for them. I think she took the TCP/IP book to bed with her every night. When you're right out of your networking classes you know everything there is to know about TCP/IP and the various models that correspond to the different layers of the ISO model. I didn't even want to work as a network administrator after interviewing with them.

    Neil

  8. #8
    Aaron_Adams
    Guest

    Re: Unix Network Programming Review

    I want to work in computer security. I'm not really interested in soley network admistration and administration, althought security embraces both in certain aspects. Wherever I can code proof of concept exploits, pen test, secure systems, and what have you, I'm happy I still have a long way to go to be able to worthy of a nice job though. *cough* SecurityFocus. They actually have an outlet in my city. Go Calgary. A SecurityFocus outlet and OpenBSD.

    I bought The C Programming Language by Kernighan and Ritchie today. I'll just read through this before I continue with Unix Network Programming I suppose. Although I might do both at the same time.

  9. #9
    vikram_nanda
    Guest

    Re:Unix Network Programming Review

    for me, instead of helping, these wrapper finctions and header files have become a pain >.
    Although, Stevens has these wrapper functions in all his books but for reasons unknown to me ??? these have troubled me only in the 'network programing' book.

    Is there another good network programing book(without all these headers and warpper functions)?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron_Adams
    So far this book has been a wonder of knowledge. I recommend it to anyone that is looking for a thorough understanding of network programming. I'm not too far yet, but I felt like expressing my thoughts on it so far.

    The only problem I have with it, is the one that everyone seems to mention, and that is the author's use of wrapper functions. This has actually caused me to take more time to learn the ccode, even though it saves code space in the book.

    I also feel wierd about starting off just using an already made header for all the programs, as I'd like to get used to knowing which headers to include for each program ahead of time, rather then have 1 header that includes all headers that may be needed. My reasoning for that is... when I make my own network application, I don't plan on including a premade header that includes a bunch of code, #ifdefs, and #defines I won't need. What I've been doing is rewriting the programs that are included, without the header file and wrapper functions just to get used to the process. The further I get into the book, I'm sure I'll become more comfortable with the wrapper functions and just including the premade header.

    Although I'm not too far into the book yet, I can already say I've learned quite a bit, and it's definately worth looking into. I'm also reading TCP/IP Illustrated Vol1, and I must say getting into the nitty gritty of the protocols while I'm doing network programming at the same time is helping. I'd recommend reading it as well, especially if you want a very in depth idea of what exactly you're programming. I've also hard that Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment ( i think that's the title ) is a good companion as well, for any interested. All of these books are written by W. Richard Stevens ( RIP ).


    P.S. I'm buying "The C Programming Language" as soon as I get payed, hopefully it will be a good companion!


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