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Thread: Linux Dependencies

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZennouRyuu";p="4314
    {Edit} I really dont feel like getting into it.

    {Edit 2} Now every thread is a chance to promote gentoo.

    You know, if you hadn't thus far been able to comprehend why many of us who use gentoo plug it so often, it's because we feel that it a good option. I have never said that anyone elses choice in distro is any better or worse than anyone elses, and I myself have two running mandrake machines and an ancient slackware too. Please try to be a little more mature than to go attacking an entire user group just because they like what they are using, there is no reason for it, and it really tends to made people wonder about your mindset. So show a little respect for peoples choices and they will respect you for it.

    And hell compile times arent that bad when you have 9 computers working away on it (distcc), KDE is up and running in an hour (thats the largest package I ever build)
    funny, that's exactly what i've been asking of gentoo people, and no it's not all of them, but only the ones that constantly push it are noticed usually.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by beezlebubsbum";p="4355
    RPM is great for those people that have no idea how to compile their software from source, or who just can't be bothered spending the time doing it. I remember when I first started in linux, it was all too common having to compile your programs from source. As a complete newb, I had no idea what a shell was, or where the hell the terminal was to actually initiate a compilation. I eventually figured it out, but holy hell, what is annoying or what. Gentoo? What a bloody hard distro to install, and not even worth it if you have a dial-up internet connection (sorry, but the majority of internet users are still using dial-up). I think that it would be great being able to compile the entire system, but you just can't do that with dial-up, because the download time is crazy. Comtux, damn you are good at all things linux, I wish I had the linux knowledge that you have!
    rpm also makes a good base package where another layer can be added that does deps (like apt-get for rpm, or urpmi)

  3. #23
    Senior Member comtux's Avatar
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    Re: Linux Dependencies

    There is nothing wrong with rpm,s deb's tgz etc etc
    I just personaly perfer to build my system my self.
    Gentoo ,Redhat ,Mandrake ,Suse, Slackware ,Debain ,Lfs & Bsd's are all good distros
    i my self have just evolved beyound these distro's i have used them all at one time or
    another right now i am at the point that i think that i can do better than them and so can the rest of us it is not hard if you have what you need right in front of you.
    So hear we are.
    To me the hardist part of linux is trying to make a decision on how to go about doing something.

  4. #24
    Mentor jro's Avatar
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    Re: Linux Dependencies

    I applaud your efforts CT. I personally don't have the time to devote to building my own packaging system. I have to fall back on portage to do the dirty work for me. It is nice to know how it could be done should I ever decide to give it a try. When ever I feel like I am getting pretty good at administering Linux, people like CT come along and remind me that I am only scratching the surface. There are so many aspects that I haven't even given much thought to.

    One thing, not really even an issue just another way to do something. To save yourself a keystroke or two when you make a tarball, instead of this:

    Code:
    tar cvf - usr etc var | gzip > Example-1.0.tar.gz
    Code:
    tar -czvf Example-1.0.tar.gz usr etc var
    The 'z' option compresses the tar with gzip, alternately you can use the 'j' option to compress the tar with bzip. You can use those same options when opening a compressed archive too. Again, nothing right or wrong with either way, just another way to do it. This is using 'tar (GNU tar) 1.14'.
    jro - http://jeff.robbins.ws
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  5. #25
    Senior Member comtux's Avatar
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    Ahhh thanks jro ill update that asap

    If anyone here can contribute to any part of this post ill add it.
    Please try to stick with eather.

    Ruby
    Perl
    Python
    Shell Scripting

    Other areas of interest would be
    Hardware detection
    Better Dep Checking
    or whatever you think could or would be usefull.
    This post will more than likely end up in the Knowledge Base.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jro";p="4382
    I applaud your efforts CT. I personally don't have the time to devote to building my own packaging system. I have to fall back on portage to do the dirty work for me. It is nice to know how it could be done should I ever decide to give it a try. When ever I feel like I am getting pretty good at administering Linux, people like CT come along and remind me that I am only scratching the surface. There are so many aspects that I haven't even given much thought to.

    One thing, not really even an issue just another way to do something. To save yourself a keystroke or two when you make a tarball, instead of this:

    Code:
    tar cvf - usr etc var | gzip > Example-1.0.tar.gz
    Code:
    tar -czvf Example-1.0.tar.gz usr etc var
    The 'z' option compresses the tar with gzip, alternately you can use the 'j' option to compress the tar with bzip. You can use those same options when opening a compressed archive too. Again, nothing right or wrong with either way, just another way to do it. This is using 'tar (GNU tar) 1.14'.
    that will work for most modern versions of tar, especially GNU, but do not consider it portable, i've had scripts crap out because of that in the past. IIRC it was on OBSD (but don't quote me)

  7. #27
    Mentor jro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by maccorin";p="4393
    that will work for most modern versions of tar, especially GNU, but do not consider it portable, i've had scripts crap out because of that in the past. IIRC it was on OBSD (but don't quote me)
    Right. That is why I included the version of tar I was using. I do know that on Solaris (don't remember the version) you have to explicitly use gnutar, because the default tar utility doesn't have the really cool options.
    jro - http://jeff.robbins.ws
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  8. #28
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    it may have been solaris i was thinking of in fact, and not OBSD... *shrugs*

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